The Safest Bathroom Flooring

There’s a lot that goes into choosing the perfect flooring for your bathroom. Along with price, appearance, water-resistance and ease of maintenance you should absolutely consider what the safest bathroom flooring option is.  

Having a non-slip surface is essential for creating a safe environment especially if there are older residents in the home. This article will review some flooring options and assist you in finding the safest bathroom flooring for your home.

Ceramic Tile 

Ceramic tile comes in a wide range of options. And while there are some very safe options, there are also some that can be very slippery especially when wet. When shopping for ceramic flooring for your bathroom consider ones that have been certified for slip resistance by the ADA as these will be a safe option for your bathroom.

Non-Slip Vinyl 

Vinyl is highly slip resistant and a very affordable option. Vinyl is also a great option for bathrooms because of its water-resistant properties. It can be installed in sheet or tiles. Tiles may give you the style you are looking for but be prepared to replace a tile or two after a year or so as the humidity may cause some of the corners to warp.

Vinyl has more give than ceramic tile meaning it will be less harmful in the event of a fall. Most likely you will need to install an underlayment, which will provide even more cushion. 

Rubber Flooring

If safety is a big concern in your home you may want to consider rubber flooring. Rubber is never slippery no matter how wet it may get. It is also very forgiving in the event of a fall. There are a lot more rubber flooring options on the market today that are more visually appealing. One downside to rubber is it can run pretty expensive.

Summary 

Out of the three flooring options, the safest option is rubber flooring. Vinyl is next and has a lot more style options. Ceramic tile, which is the more common flooring choice for bathrooms, can be the most dangerous.  However there are many slip-resistant options available.

 

Sources: homemods.org, nlm.nih.gov, ext.colostate.edu